Pope Francis has been photographed in the Vatican holding a sign calling for Argentine-UK talks about the Falkland Islands, called Malvinas in Argentina.

The pontiff is from Argentina. He received the sign from Gustavo Hoyo, leader of a campaign for dialogue on the islands, during a papal audience.

Pope with the message 300x169 Pope Francis has been photographed in the Vatican holding a sign calling for Argentine UK talks about the Falkland Islands, called Malvinas in Argentina. Romano Pisciotti
Pope with the message

 

A senior Vatican official told the BBC that Pope Francis “did not know and did not realise what was written on it”.
In 1982 UK forces defeated Argentine troops, who had invaded the Falklands.
The war left Argentina and the UK still disputing the islands’ sovereignty – but a UN resolution has called for dialogue to reach a settlement.
The sign held by the Pope on Wednesday said: “It’s time for dialogue between Argentina and the United Kingdom over the Falkland Islands.” *

*(Malvinas)

 

Romano Pisciotti, surfing web

 

Liberty ship

The Liberty ship was a class of cargo ship built in the United States during World War II. Though British in conception, the design was adapted by the U.S. for its simple, low-cost construction. Mass produced on an unprecedented scale, the now iconic Liberty ship came to symbolize U.S. wartime industrial output.

The class was developed to meet British orders for transports to replace those torpedoed by German U-boats. The vessels were purchased both for the U.S. fleet and lend-lease deliveries of war materiel to Britain and the Soviet Union. Eighteen American shipyards built 2,710 Liberty ships between 1941 and 1945, easily the largest number of ships produced to a single design.

SS John W Brown 300x178 Liberty ship Romano Pisciotti
SS_John_W_Brown

 

Their production mirrored on a much larger scale the manufacture of the Hog Islander and similar standardized ship types during World War I. The immensity of the effort, the sheer number of ships built, the vaunted role of Rosie the Riveters in their construction, and the survival of some far longer than their original five-year design life, all make them the subject of much continued interest.

 

Only a handful remain in 2015, two as operational museum ships.

 

Romano Pisciotti, surfing web