Hackers target internet address bug to disrupt sites

Hackers are exploiting a serious flaw in the internet’s architecture, according to a security firm.

84650535 gettyimages 480887709 300x169 Hackers target internet address bug to disrupt sites Romano Pisciotti

The bug targets systems which convert URLs into IP addresses.
Exploiting it could threaten the smooth running of internet services as it allows hackers to launch denial-of-service attacks on websites, potentially forcing them offline.
Regular internet users are unlikely to be severely affected, however.
Bind is the name of a variety of Domain Name System (DNS) software used on the majority of internet servers.
The recently identified bug allows attackers to crash the software, therefore taking the DNS service offline and preventing URLs, for example, from working.
A patch for the flaw is already available, but many systems are yet to be updated.
The Internet Systems Consortium (ISC), which develops Bind, said in a tweet that the vulnerability was “particularly critical” and “easily exploited”.

Romano Pisciotti, surfing web

The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP)

TANKER OFFLOADING

LOOP safely and efficiently offloads tankers of crude oil that are imported into the U.S. from the Arabian Gulf, Russia, West Africa, the North Sea, Mexico and South America. Many tankers that discharge their cargoes at LOOP are supertankers and are designated as either “very large crude carriers” (VLCCs) or “ultra large crude carriers” (ULCCs). These massive ships can be longer than the Empire State Building is tall.

In response to change US supply patterns, LOOP has made modifications to it’s mooring configuration to receive Jones Act compliant Medium Range (MR) tankers to receive cargoes from US ports. It also allows for FPSO shuttle tankers to deliver their cargo to LOOP.

marine hose The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) Romano Pisciotti
marine hose

The LOOP oil port and pipeline were specially constructed to accommodate these enormous vessels. Standing in 110 feet of water some 20 miles from land in the Gulf of Mexico, the LOOP Marine Terminal can comfortably accommodate tankers calling at the port.

Once anchored at one of the three single point mooring (SPM) buoys, hoses are attached to a ship’s manifold for offloading. Hi-tech, flexible hoses are attached to the ship’s manifold to receive and transport the crude oil. It is pumped from the ship in an underground pipeline.

Oil movement controllers from LOOP, in close communication with the ship, initiate the offloading of the vessel to the LOOP Marine Terminal where it is pumped into a 48-inch diameter pipeline to the LOOP storage facilities at a rate of up to 100,000 barrels per hour.

The oil arrives at the LOOP storage facility in Clovelly, Louisiana, some 45 miles from the marine terminal. There the oil is stored in a network of underground caverns and aboveground tanks. The LOOP marine terminal, pipeline and storage facilities reside in a Foreign Trade Zone (FTZ) which provides opportunities for companies importing foreign crude oil to optimize their U.S. Customs duties.

pumping platform The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) Romano Pisciotti
pumping platform

 

 

 

Romano Pisciotti surfing web

What would be the future of work for us humans?

 

bambina pensante What would be the future of work for us humans? Romano Pisciotti

 

“I am not a crystal ball gazer, however what I know is that work would be scarce and primarily consist of things that require extreme creativity, adaptability or specialization. A thing that computers would take time to learn and reach a level of perfection. This kind of work would hopefully survive through the next few decades before artificial and machine intelligence would rise to even challenge that!!”

pittore What would be the future of work for us humans? Romano Pisciotti

by Manish Kumar
Head Offering Portfolio Management & Customer Enablement (Consulting and System Integration)

 

Romano Pisciotti surfing web